Dietary intake, food pattern, and abnormal blood glucose status of middle-aged adults: a cross-sectional community-based study in Myanmar

  • Hlaing Hlaing Hlaing University of Medicine-Mandalay, Myanmar
  • Tippawan Liabsuetrakul Prince of Songkla University, Hatyai, Thailand
Keywords: abnormal blood glucose status, dietary intake, factor analysis, food pattern, suburban, urban

Abstract

Background: Lifestyle changes, particularly dietary intake, had resulted in increasing trends of type-2 diabetes mellitus worldwide. However, dietary intake is diverse across country contexts. This study aimed to compare the dietary intake, food patterns, and blood glucose among middle-aged adults living in urban and suburban areas in Mandalay city, Myanmar, and explore their relationships.

Methods: A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted during June–November 2014. Adults aged 35–64 were randomly selected and requested to record all food they ate in a 4-day diary. Fasting and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose values were measured over two consecutive days. Dietary intakes were calculated in terms of energy, macronutrients, glycemic index, and glycemic load, and food patterns were identified by factor analysis. The relationships between food pattern, dietary intake, and blood glucose were assessed.

Results: Of 440 participants, dietary intake between urban and suburban residents was significantly different. Six food patterns were identified. There was no difference in fasting and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose between urban and suburban residents, but a strong correlation between fasting blood glucose and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose was found (correlation coefficient=0.8). Identification of abnormal blood glucose status using original fasting and converted 2-hour postprandial values showed substantial agreement (prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted Kappa= 0.8). Relationships between food patterns and blood glucose or abnormal blood glucose status were not found.

Conclusion: Food patterns were associated with dietary intake, not with abnormal blood glucose status. Two-hour postprandial blood glucose was highly correlated with fasting blood glucose and may be used for identifying abnormal blood glucose status.

Keywords: abnormal blood glucose status; dietary intake; factor analysis; food pattern; suburban; urban

(Published: 4 May 2016)

Citation: Food & Nutrition Research 2016, 60: 28898 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v60.28898

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Author Biographies

Hlaing Hlaing Hlaing, University of Medicine-Mandalay, Myanmar

Lecturer,

Department of Preventive and Social Medicine,

University of Medicine-Mandalay,

Myanmar

Tippawan Liabsuetrakul, Prince of Songkla University, Hatyai, Thailand
Head of Epidemiology Unit and Director of WHO-CC for Research and Training on Epidemiology
Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine,
Prince of Songkla University
Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand
Published
2016-05-04
How to Cite
1.
Hlaing H, Liabsuetrakul T. Dietary intake, food pattern, and abnormal blood glucose status of middle-aged adults: a cross-sectional community-based study in Myanmar. fnr [Internet]. 2016May4 [cited 2019Apr.23];600. Available from: https://foodandnutritionresearch.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/1064
Section
Meta-analyses