Nutrient Density to Climate Impact index is an inappropriate system for ranking beverages in order of climate impact per nutritional value

  • Peter Scarborough
  • Mike Rayner

Abstract

Dear Editors, A recent paper published in Food & Nutrition Research contributes to the important research area of how to achieve nutritional goals while reducing the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the food system (1). The paper introduced a novel method of measuring the nutrient density of a food or drink in comparison to GHG emissions associated with the production, manufacturing, packaging, and transportation of that food or drink, using a life-cycle perspective - an index called Nutrient Density to Climate Impact (NDCI). The authors of the paper used the NDCI index to compare eight beverages: milk, soft drink, orange juice, beer, wine, bottled carbonated water, soy drink, and oat drink. The NDCI index for milk was higher than for the other beverages, and the authors concluded that ‘milk both has the highest nutrient density per se, and has the highest nutrient density in relation to GHG emissions of the compared beverages. We also conclude that the NDCI index is a tool that facilitates inclusion of a nutritional aspect of the climate debate.’

(Published: 19 November 2010)

Citation: Food & Nutrition Research 2010, 54: 5681 - DOI: 10.3402/fnr.v54i0.5681

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Published
2010-11-19
How to Cite
Scarborough, P., & Rayner, M. (2010). Nutrient Density to Climate Impact index is an inappropriate system for ranking beverages in order of climate impact per nutritional value. Food & Nutrition Research. https://doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v54i0.5681
Section
Letters to the Editor