Blood selenium levels and contribution of food groups to selenium intake in adolescent girls in Iceland

  • Edda Y. Gudmundsdottir Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital
  • Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital
  • Arngrimur Thorlacius Agricultural University of Iceland
  • Olafur Reykdal Matis ohf, Icelandic Food and Biotech R&D
  • Helga Gunnlaugsdottir Matis ohf, Icelandic Food and Biotech R&D
  • Inga Thorsdottir Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital
  • Laufey Steingrimsdottir Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital
Keywords: Selenium, Diet, Micronutrient status, Adolescent girls, Fish consumption, Milk

Abstract

Background/objectives: Significant changes have been reported in dietary habits and food availability in Iceland that would be expected to compromise selenium intake and status, especially among young people. These include substantial decreases in the consumption of fish and milk, as well as the selenium content of imported wheat. The aim of this study was to assess selenium in the diet and whole blood of adolescent girls, as well as define the most important foods contributing to intake and blood concentrations of selenium.

Design: The subjects were 96 randomly selected girls, aged 16-20, who answered a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for dietary assessment. Selenium intake from each food group was calculated in mg/day. Blood samples were collected for measurement of whole blood selenium.

Results: Mean dietary selenium was 51 ± 25 mg/day. Milk/dairy products, including cheese, contributed 36 ± 14% of total dietary selenium; fish 18 ± 12%; and bread/cereal products 13 ± 6%. Mean whole blood selenium was 117 ± 12 µg/l (range 90-208); nearly 90% of subjects were above the optimal level of 100 µg/l. Fish and bread/cereal products were the only foods significantly correlated with selenium in blood (r = 0.32; P =0.002 and r = 0.22; P = 0.04, respectively) while no correlation was found with milk and dairy products in spite of their greater contribution to total selenium intake.

Conclusion: In this population of Icelandic adolescent girls, selenium intake and status seem acceptable. Judging from associations between intake and blood levels, fish and cereals may be the most important contributors to blood selenium.

Keywords: selenium; diet; micronutrient status; adolescent girls; fish consumption; milk consumption

(Published: 31 August 2012)

Citation: Food & Nutrition Research 2012. 56: 18476 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v56i0.18476

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Author Biographies

Edda Y. Gudmundsdottir, Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital
Researcher, Faculty for Food Science and Nutrition
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir, Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital
Professor, Faculty for Food Science and Nutrition, School of Helath Sciences,  University of Iceland
Arngrimur Thorlacius, Agricultural University of Iceland
Associate Professor, Faculty for Land and Animal Resources
Olafur Reykdal, Matis ohf, Icelandic Food and Biotech R&D
Specialist
Helga Gunnlaugsdottir, Matis ohf, Icelandic Food and Biotech R&D
PhD, Head Chemical Analysis
Inga Thorsdottir, Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital
Professor, Faculty for Food Science and Nutrition, School of Helath Sciences,  University of Iceland
Laufey Steingrimsdottir, Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital
Professor, Faculty for Food Science and Nutrition, School of Helath Sciences,  University of Iceland
Published
2012-08-31
How to Cite
1.
Gudmundsdottir E, Gunnarsdottir I, Thorlacius A, Reykdal O, Gunnlaugsdottir H, Thorsdottir I, Steingrimsdottir L. Blood selenium levels and contribution of food groups to selenium intake in adolescent girls in Iceland. fnr [Internet]. 2012Aug.31 [cited 2018Dec.13];00. Available from: https://foodandnutritionresearch.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/474
Section
Original Articles