A model to secure a stable iodine concentration in milk

  • Gisken Trøan Norwegian University Of Life Sciences
  • Lisbeth Dahl National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES)
  • Helle Margrete Meltzer Norwegian Institute of Public Health
  • Marianne Hope Abel Tine SA
  • Ulf Geir Indahl Norwegian University of Life Sciences
  • Anna Haug Norwegian University of Life Sciences
  • Egil Prestløkken Norwegian University of Life Sciences
Keywords: Human nutrition, Animal nutrition, Model development

Abstract

Background: Dairy products account for approximately 60% of the iodine intake in the Norwegian population. The iodine concentration in cow’s milk varies considerably, depending on feeding practices, season, and amount of iodine and rapeseed products in cow fodder. The variation in iodine in milk affects the risk of iodine deficiency or excess in the population.

Objective: The first goal of this study was to develop a model to predict the iodine concentration in milk based on the concentration of iodine and rapeseed or glucosinolate in feed, as a tool to securing stable iodine concentration in milk. A second aim was to estimate the impact of different iodine levels in milk on iodine nutrition in the Norwegian population.

Design: Two models were developed on the basis of results from eight published and two unpublished studies from the past 20 years. The models were based on different iodine concentrations in the fodder combined with either glucosinolate (Model 1) or rapeseed cake/meal (Model 2). To illustrate the impact of different iodine concentrations in milk on iodine intake, we simulated the iodine contribution from dairy products in different population groups based on food intake data in the most recent dietary surveys in Norway.

Results: The models developed could predict iodine concentration in milk. Cross-validation showed good fit and confirmed the explanatory power of the models. Our calculations showed that dairy products with current iodine level in milk (200 µg/kg) cover 68, 49, 108 and 56% of the daily iodine requirements for men, women, 2-year-old children, and pregnant women, respectively.

Conclusions: Securing a stable level of iodine in milk by adjusting iodine concentration in different cow feeds is thus important for preventing excess intake in small children and iodine deficiency in pregnant and non-pregnant women.

Keywords: iodine; milk; rapeseed; fodder; model; diet

(Published: 18 December 2015)

Citation: Food & Nutrition Research 2015, 59: 29829 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v59.29829

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Author Biographies

Gisken Trøan, Norwegian University Of Life Sciences
Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences
Helle Margrete Meltzer, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Division of Environmental Medicine
Ulf Geir Indahl, Norwegian University of Life Sciences
Department of Mathematical Sciences and Technology
Anna Haug, Norwegian University of Life Sciences
Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences
Egil Prestløkken, Norwegian University of Life Sciences
Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences
Published
2015-12-18
How to Cite
1.
Trøan G, Dahl L, Meltzer HM, Abel MH, Indahl UG, Haug A, Prestløkken E. A model to secure a stable iodine concentration in milk. fnr [Internet]. 2015Dec.18 [cited 2020Mar.28];59. Available from: https://foodandnutritionresearch.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/770
Section
Original Articles

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