Chronic treatment with epigallocatechin gallate reduces motor hyperactivity and affectsin vitro tested intestinal motility of spontaneously hypertensive rats

  • Maria Assunta Potenza University of Bari "Aldo Moro"
  • Monica Montagnani University of Bari "Aldo Moro"
  • Carmela Nacci University of Bari "Aldo Moro"
  • Maria Antonietta De Salvia University of Bari "Aldo Moro"
Keywords: human nutrition, physical activity

Abstract

Background: Green tea catechins seem to contribute toward reducing body weight and fat.

Objective: We aimed to investigate whether chronic administration of (–)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin of green tea, reduces weight gain in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), an animal model of metabolic syndrome, by increasing motor activity and/or by altering gastrointestinal motility.

Design: Nine-week-old SHR were randomly assigned to two groups and treated by gavage for 3 weeks with vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide or EGCG (200 mg/kg/day). Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats were treated with vehicle alone. The effect of chronic administration of EGCG was evaluated on open-field motor activity and on ex vivo colonic and duodenal motility. Moreover, in vitro acute effect of 20-min incubation with EGCG (100 µM) or vehicle was evaluated in colonic and duodenal specimens from untreated WKY rats and SHR.

Results: Vehicle-treated SHR were normoglycemic and hyperinsulinemic, and showed a reduction of plasma adiponectin when compared to vehicle-treated WKY rats. In addition, consistent with fasting glucose and insulin values, vehicle-treated SHR were more insulin resistant than age-matched vehicle-treated WKY rats. Chronic treatment for 3 weeks with EGCG improved insulin sensitivity, raised plasma adiponectin levels, and reduced food intake and weight gain in SHR. Vehicle-treated SHR showed increased open-field motor activity (both crossings and rearings) when tested after each week of treatment. The overall hyperactivity of vehicle-treated SHR was significantly reduced to the levels of vehicle-treated WKY rats after 2 and 3 weeks of EGCG treatment. Colonic and duodenal preparations obtained from SHR chronically treated in vivo with EGCG showed reduced responses to carbachol (0.05–5 µM) and increased inhibitory response to electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1–10 Hz, 13 V, 1 msec, 10-sec train duration), respectively. In vitro acute EGCG incubation (100 µM, 20 min) of colonic and duodenum strips obtained from untreated SHR and WKY rats showed a reduced contractile colonic response to a fixed dose of carbachol (1.5 µM) only in SHR with respect to its own vehicle, whereas the inhibitory duodenal response to a fixed EFS frequency (5 Hz) was significantly reduced in both WKY rats and SHR groups with respect to their own vehicle.

Conclusions: These data suggest that EGCG affects body weight gain in rats and this effect seems to be due to the altered intestinal motility and not to increased motor activity.

Keywords: green tea; weight gain; colon; duodenum

(Published: 17 February 2016)

Citation: Food & Nutrition Research 2016, 60: 28373 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v60.28373

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Author Biographies

Maria Assunta Potenza, University of Bari "Aldo Moro"

Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology

Assistant Professor

Monica Montagnani, University of Bari "Aldo Moro"

Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology

Assistant Professor

Carmela Nacci, University of Bari "Aldo Moro"

Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology

Assistant Professor

Maria Antonietta De Salvia, University of Bari "Aldo Moro"

Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology

Assistant Professor

Published
2016-02-17
How to Cite
1.
Potenza M, Montagnani M, Nacci C, De Salvia M. Chronic treatment with epigallocatechin gallate reduces motor hyperactivity and affects<em>in</em&gt; vitro tested intestinal motility of spontaneously hypertensive rats. fnr [Internet]. 2016Feb.17 [cited 2019Jul.16];600. Available from: https://foodandnutritionresearch.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/1042
Section
Original Articles