Thermic effect of a meal and appetite in adults: an individual participant data meta-analysis of meal-test trials

  • Anne-Marie Ravn Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C
  • Nikolaj Ture Gregersen Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C
  • Robin Christensen The Parker Institute: Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital at Frederiksberg, Copenhagen F
  • Lone Graasbøl Rasmussen Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C
  • Ole Hels StatistiConsult, Ølstykke
  • Anita Belza Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C
  • Anne Raben Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C
  • Thomas Meinert Larsen Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C
  • Søren Toubro Reduce APS – Research Clinic of Nutrition, Roskilde
  • Arne Astrup Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C
Keywords: thermic effect of a meal, diet-induced thermogenesis, appetite, energy expenditure, satiety, Composite Appetite Score

Abstract

Background: Thermic effect of a meal (TEF) has previously been suggested to influence appetite.

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether there is an association between appetite and TEF. Second, to examine whether protein intake is associated with TEF or appetite.

Design: Individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis on studies were performed at the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Five randomized meal-test studies, with 111 participants, were included. The included studies measured energy expenditure (EE) in respiration chambers and pre- and postprandial appetite sensations using Visual Analog Scales (VAS). The primary meta-analysis was based on a generic-inverse variance random-effects model, pooling individual study Spearman’s correlation coefficients, resulting in a combined r-value with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The I2 value quantifies the proportion (%) of the variation in point estimates due to among-study differences.

Results: The IPD meta-analysis found no association between satiety and TEF expressed as the incremental area under the curve (TEFiAUC) (r=0.06 [95% CI −0.16 to 0.28], P=0.58; I2=15.8%). Similarly, Composite Appetite Score (CAS) was not associated with TEFiAUC (r=0.08 [95% CI −0.12 to 0.28], P=0.45; I2=0%). Posthoc analyses showed no association between satiety or CAS and TEF expressed as a percentage of energy intake (EI) (P>0.49) or TEF expressed as a percentage of baseline EE (P>0.17). When adjusting for covariates, TEFiAUC was associated with protein intake (P=0.0085).

Conclusions: This IPD meta-analysis found no evidence supporting an association between satiety or CAS and TEF at protein intakes ∼15 E% (range 11–30 E%).

Keywords: thermic effect of a meal; diet-induced thermogenesis; appetite; energy expenditure; satiety; Composite Appetite Score

(Published: 23 December 2013)

To access the appendices to this article please see Supplementary files in the column to the right (under Article Tools)

Citation: Food & Nutrition Research 2013. 57: 19676 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v57i0.19676

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Published
2013-12-23
How to Cite
1.
Ravn A-M, Gregersen N, Christensen R, Rasmussen L, Hels O, Belza A, Raben A, Larsen T, Toubro S, Astrup A. Thermic effect of a meal and appetite in adults: an individual participant data meta-analysis of meal-test trials. fnr [Internet]. 2013Dec.23 [cited 2019Jun.25];00. Available from: https://foodandnutritionresearch.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/547
Section
Meta-analyses