The influence of acetylsalicylic acid and alcohol on absorption kinetics of hen ́s egg white in a human passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model

  • Nicolaj Brandt Department of Dermatology and Allergy Center, Odense Research Center for Anaphylaxis (ORCA), Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark
  • Esben Eller Department of Dermatology and Allergy Center, Odense Research Center for Anaphylaxis (ORCA), Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark
  • Anja Pahlow Mose Department of Dermatology and Allergy Center, Odense Research Center for Anaphylaxis (ORCA), Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark
  • Carsten Bindslev-Jensen Department of Dermatology and Allergy Center, Odense Research Center for Anaphylaxis (ORCA), Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark
  • Charlotte Mortz Department of Dermatology and Allergy Center, Odense Research Center for Anaphylaxis (ORCA), Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark
Keywords: Co-factors, augmentation factor, egg allergy, allergic reaction, adults, children.

Abstract

Background: Despite the well-known fact that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) can induce anaphylaxis in patients susceptible to wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, few studies have sought to investigate the effects of cofactors on type-1 food allergy and none with ASA and hen’s egg and hen’s egg and alcohol combined.

Methods and results: We applied the experimental model of ‘passive cutaneous anaphylaxis’ in humans to study whether the absorption kinetics of egg white is altered while being treated with ASA or under the influence of alcohol. Donor sera from four egg allergic patients with specific immunoglobulin E (s-IgE) to ovalbumin (0.1–8.87–19.5–170 kUA/L) were injected intracutaneously into the forearm of 12 healthy volunteers who were then challenged separately to: 1) egg white 2) egg white + ASA and 3) egg white + alcohol. ‘Time to wheal’ and ‘wheal size’ were compared among the three experiments.

We saw that ‘time to wheal’ with both ASA (P = 0.001) and alcohol (P = 0.019) added as cofactor significantly decreased compared with baseline.

Conclusion: In this passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model, ASA and alcohol affected both reaction time and size of reactions elicited after egg ingestion. This suggests that patients with egg allergy could have faster and more severe reactions during ASA treatment or under alcohol influence.

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References


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Published
2021-11-24
How to Cite
Brandt, N., Eller, E., Mose, A. P., Bindslev-Jensen, C., & Mortz, C. (2021). The influence of acetylsalicylic acid and alcohol on absorption kinetics of hen ́s egg white in a human passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model. Food & Nutrition Research, 65. https://doi.org/10.29219/fnr.v65.7618
Section
Original Articles