What characterises women who eat potatoes? A cross-sectional study among 74,208 women in the Norwegian Women and Cancer cohort

  • Lene A. Åsli Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway
  • Tonje Braaten Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway
  • Anja Olsen Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Eiliv Lund Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway
  • Guri Skeie Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway
Keywords: Potato consumption, socioeconomic determinants, dietary factors, women`s diet, nutrition, Norway, cross-sectional study, epidemiology

Abstract

Background: Studies of potato consumption have shown that age, region, socioeconomic status, and household structure are important determinants.

Objective: This study aims to map which factors influence potato consumption among women in the Norwegian Women and Cancer (NOWAC) study.

Design: A cross-sectional study using a postal questionnaire among 74,208 NOWAC participants aged 41–70.

Results: Results showed that 56% of the women ate at least two potatoes a day. A north–south gradient in potato consumption was observed in logistic regression models (OR: 3.41, 95% CI: 3.19–3.64 for the north compared to the capital). Women in households with children had lower odds of high potato consumption than women living only with a partner, and women who lived alone had the lowest odds of all (OR: 0.39, 95% CI: 0.37–0.41). Smokers had higher odds of high potato consumption, while diabetics had lower odds. The odds of high potato consumption were greater among older women, and among those with lower income and education. In a sub-cohort, women who were dieting had lower odds of high potato consumption. Consumption of different foods varied in the low versus the high potato consumption group, with largest effect for fish and pasta/rice. The groups had similar nutrient densities.

Conclusions: In addition to lifestyle and socioeconomic factors, health-related factors like smoking and diabetes were found to influence potato consumption. The high potato consumption group had an especially high consumption of fish and a low consumption of pasta/rice, though the nutrient density in the groups was similar.

Keywords: potato consumption; socioeconomic determinants; dietary factors; women’s diet; nutrition; Norway; cross-sectional study; epidemiology

(Published: 19 February 2015)

Citation: Food & Nutrition Research 2015, 59: 25703 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v59.25703

 

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Author Biographies

Lene A. Åsli, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway
PHD student
Tonje Braaten, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway

ass.Professor

Anja Olsen, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
Dr.
Eiliv Lund, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway
Professor, Principal Investigator of the NOWAC study.
Guri Skeie, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway
ass.Professor
Published
2015-02-19
How to Cite
Åsli, L. A., Braaten, T., Olsen, A., Lund, E., & Skeie, G. (2015). What characterises women who eat potatoes? A cross-sectional study among 74,208 women in the Norwegian Women and Cancer cohort. Food & Nutrition Research, 59. https://doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v59.25703
Section
Original Articles