Hypolipidemic activities of partially deacetylated α-chitin nanofibers/nanowhiskers in mice

  • Wenbo Ye
  • Liang Liu
  • Juan Yu
  • Shilin Liu
  • Qiang Yong
  • Yimin Fan Nanjing Forestry University
Keywords: chitin, nanofibers/nanowhiskers, hypolipidemic effects, cholesterol

Abstract

Partially deacetylated α-chitin nanofibers/nanowhiskers mixtures (DEChNs) were prepared by 35% sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment followed by disintegration in water at pH 3–4. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypolipidemic effects of DEChNs at different dosage levels in male Kunming mice. The male mice were randomly separated into five groups, that is, a normal diet group, a high-fat diet group, and three DEChN groups that were treated with different doses of DEChN dispersions (L: low dose, M: medium dose, H: high dose). Primarily, the DEChNs significantly decreased body weight (BW) gain and adipose tissue weight (ATW) gain of mice. Meanwhile, the decreasing extent of weight ratios between ATW and BW was dependent on the dose of DEChNs. Moreover, the DEChNs prevented an increase in plasma lipids (cholesterol and triacylglycerol) in mice when they were fed a high-fat diet. Histopathological examination of hepatocytes revealed that the DEChNs were effective in decreasing the accumulation of lipids in the liver and preventing the development of a fatty liver. The results suggested that the DEChNs reduced the absorption of dietary fat and cholesterol in vivo and could effectively reduce hypercholesterolemia in mice.

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Author Biographies

Wenbo Ye

Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center of Efficient Processing and Utilization of Forest Resources, Jiangsu Key Lab of Biomass-Based Green Fuel and Chemicals, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China.

Liang Liu

Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center of Efficient Processing and Utilization of Forest Resources, Jiangsu Key Lab of Biomass-Based Green Fuel and Chemicals, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China.

Juan Yu

Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center of Efficient Processing and Utilization of Forest Resources, Jiangsu Key Lab of Biomass-Based Green Fuel and Chemicals, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China.

Shilin Liu

College of Food Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China.

Qiang Yong

Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center of Efficient Processing and Utilization of Forest Resources, Jiangsu Key Lab of Biomass-Based Green Fuel and Chemicals, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China.

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Published
2018-07-17
How to Cite
1.
Ye W, Liu L, Yu J, Liu S, Yong Q, Fan Y. Hypolipidemic activities of partially deacetylated α-chitin nanofibers/nanowhiskers in mice. fnr [Internet]. 2018Jul.17 [cited 2018Dec.19];620. Available from: https://foodandnutritionresearch.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/1295
Section
Original Articles