Implementing the World Health Organization Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health

  • Colin Tukuitonga
  • Ingrid Keller

Abstract

The World Health Organization (WHO) Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health (DPAS) was adopted by the World Health Assembly in May 2004 (Resolution 57.17). Implementing DPAS is challenging because current investment in chronic disease prevention and control at national and international levels seriously lags behind what is required, and variable levels of political commitment lead to a limited capacity to respond effectively. Nevertheless, WHO Resolutions are valuable advocacy tools and, thus, DPAS presents a golden opportunity to develop national chronic disease prevention and control policies, plans and programmes where none exists, or to strengthen existing national responses where these are already in existence. WHO is also using the opportunity to engage all stakeholders in aligning their plans and activities with the objectives of DPAS. Non-governmental organizations, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, relevant WHO Collaborating Centres and the private sector (especially the food and non-alcoholic beverage drinks manufacturers and advertisers) are particularly important. Some activities are undertaken at the global level, e.g. interactions with Codex, and others are undertaken at the regional office level, e.g. providing technical support to countries. A critical aspect of the implementation process involves the production of suitable tools - guidelines, frameworks, protocols and good practice models - in a range of areas, to assist member states with the implementation of DPAS.

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Published
2005-09-01
How to Cite
Tukuitonga, C., & Keller, I. (2005). Implementing the World Health Organization Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health. Food & Nutrition Research, 122-126. https://doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v49i3.1535