Consumer protection through a legislative ban on industrially produced trans fatty acids in foods in Denmark

  • Steen Stender
  • Jørn Dyerberg
  • Arne Astrup

Abstract

Legislation has, within a few years, virtually eliminated the intake of industrially produced trans fatty acids (IP-TFA) in Denmark, by banning any food with an IP-TFA content greater than 2% of total fat. This accomplishment has been obtained without noticeable effects on the availability, price or quality of foods previously containing high amounts of IP-TFA. Various public health organizations, including the World Health Organization, have recommended reducing the consumption of IP-TFA, and efforts have been made in several countries to comply, through the mandatory TFA labelling of prepackaged food, societal pressure and industrial initiatives to lower the content of IP-TFA in foods. Yet still, high concentrations of IP-TFA are found in popular foods in several countries including Norway and Sweden. This indicates that millions of people currently have intakes of IP-TFA that increase their risk of coronary heart disease. The Danish experience demonstrates that this risk can be eliminated. Keywords: fast food; labelling; legislation; recommendations; regulation; snack; trans fatty acids

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Published
2006-12-01
How to Cite
1.
Stender S, Dyerberg J, Astrup A. Consumer protection through a legislative ban on industrially produced trans fatty acids in foods in Denmark. fnr [Internet]. 2006Dec.1 [cited 2019Apr.25];:155-60. Available from: https://foodandnutritionresearch.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/412