Administration of Jerusalem artichoke reduces the postprandial plasma glucose and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) concentrations in humans

  • Hirokazu Takahashi Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan; Liver Center, Saga University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan
  • Akane Nakajima Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan; Liver Center, Saga University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan
  • Yuichi Matsumoto Center for Education and Research in Agricultural Innovation, Faculty of Agriculture, Saga University, Karatsu, Saga, Japan
  • Hitoe Mori Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan
  • Kanako Inoue Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan
  • Hiroko Yamanouchi Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan
  • Kenichi Tanaka Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan
  • Yuki Tomiga Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan
  • Maki Miyahara Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan
  • Tomomi Yada Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan; Liver Center, Saga University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan
  • Yumiko Iba Center of Nutritional Education, Saga University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan
  • Yayoi Matsuda Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan; and Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
  • Keiichi Watanabe Center for Education and Research in Agricultural Innovation, Faculty of Agriculture, Saga University, Karatsu, Saga, Japan
  • Keizo Anzai Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan
Keywords: Kikuimo, Topinambou, incretin, glucagon-like peptide-1, impaired glucose tolerance, diabetes mellitus

Abstract

Background: The consumption of Jerusalem artichoke has multiple beneficial effects against diabetes and obesity.

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a single administration of Jerusalem artichoke tubers on postprandial glycemia and the concentrations of incretin hormones in humans.

Method: Grated Jerusalem artichoke was administered prior to a meal (Trial 1; white rice for prediabetic participants, n = 10). Dose-dependent effect of Jerusalem artichoke (Trial 2; white rice for prediabetic participants, n = 4) and effect prior to the fat-rich meal were also investigated (Trial 3; healthy participants, n = 5) in this pilot study. Circulating glucose, insulin, triglyceride, glucagon, active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and active glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) concentrations were subsequently measured in all the trials.

Results: Jerusalem artichoke significantly reduced the glucose and GIP concentrations after the consumption of either meal in Trial 1 and Trial 3, whereas there were no differences in the insulin, glucagon, and active GLP-1 concentrations. Also, there was no significant difference in the triglyceride concentration after the ingestion of the fat-rich meal in Trial 3. The glucose and GIP-lowering effects were dose-dependent, and the consumption of at least 100 g of Jerusalem artichoke was required to have these effects in Trial 2.

Conclusion: This study demonstrates that a single administration of Jerusalem artichoke tubers reduces postprandial glucose and active GIP concentrations in prediabetic and healthy individuals.

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Published
2022-04-04
How to Cite
TakahashiH., NakajimaA., MatsumotoY., MoriH., InoueK., YamanouchiH., TanakaK., TomigaY., MiyaharaM., YadaT., IbaY., MatsudaY., WatanabeK., & AnzaiK. (2022). Administration of Jerusalem artichoke reduces the postprandial plasma glucose and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) concentrations in humans. Food & Nutrition Research, 66. https://doi.org/10.29219/fnr.v66.7870
Section
Original Articles